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The Borgias and Their Enemies Doc ☆ Download  Eyltransferservices Ô [Download] ➺ The Borgias and Their Enemies: 1431-1519 ➿ Join or create book clubs – Eyltransferservices.co.uk Christopher Hibberts latest history brings the family and the world they lived inthe glittering Rome ofChristopher Hibberts latest history brings the family and the world they lived inthe glittering Rome of the Italian Renaissanceto lifeThe name Borgia is synonymous with the corruption nepotism and greed that were rife in Renaissance Italy The powerful voracious Rodrigo Borgia better known to history as Pope Alexander VI was the central figure of the dynasty Two of his seven papal offspring also rose to power and fameLucrezia Borgia his daughter whose husband was famously murdered by her brother and that brother Cesare who served as the model for Niccol Machiavellis The Prince Notorious for seizing power wealth land and titles through bribery marriage and murder the dynastys dramatic rise from its Spanish roots to its occupation of the highest position in Renaissance society forms a gripping tale Erudite witty and always insightful Hibbert removes the layers of myth around the Borgia family and creates a portrait alive with his superb sense of character and place Ignorance Confession Before I read this book I had absolutely no idea what or who the “Borgias” were I love history but the majority of my knowledge is geared towards my home country US and really doesn’t stretch than 250 years ago when not coincidentally was when my home country was established I am however always keen to learn about history everywhere so when this book showed up as a bargain on I cautiously snapped it up 300 pages later this was a journey well taken I enjoyed the book and now know who the Borgias wereWithout going into too much detail of who this family was let’s just say that they were a very powerful Italian family during the years mentioned in the title of this book The head of the family was Rodrigo Borgia who may or may not be better known as Pope Alexander VI For those not too familiar with the Catholic Church it wasn’t always led by holy philanthropic celibate men Oh no The position of “Pope” was sadly seen in a much different vein in the times before Luther and the Protestant Reformation uite often those highest in the church were some of the most unscrupulous greedy men in history Their view of the scriptures was often uite twisted and the fact that they were a sort of ‘officer’ of the church meant that they could pretty much do and say whatever they wanted while the humble subjects simply bowed in obedience and reverence Side note Most of these humble subjects never learned how to read So they knew what the Bible was but really didn’t know what it saidSo as our book starts we get a bit of a background of Rome during the time and many of the key individuals Rodrigo Borgia is one such individual Is Rodrigo an evil man? Well this book never explicitly states so We know he’s a politician and he has to make several unscrupulous deals ‘under the table’ as well as manipulate many of his enemies but hey are politicians today much different? So yes today it’s hard to imagine that someone that holds the position of Pope could be so sleazy but we must remember to keep the narrative in context of the timesRodrigo has several children as well yes Popes had wives children and mistresses and by the time he is Alexander VI his children are somewhat grown We read about their comings and goings as well Some like daughter Lucrezia have a host of husbands and lovers and are followed by the population insatiably as if they were reading the National Enuirer His son Cesare however seems to have a sadistic streak that puts fear into the entire nation This is a prime example of a rich spoiled kid who can do whatever he wants since his daddy is the big boss His treacherous behavior is indeed scary In fact it seems like most of the book really centers on these two children as they have such ‘interesting’ lives There are a host of other children and family members yet their sins and sensuality don’t compare to Lucrezia and Cesare so they don’t warrant as much space in this narrativeThis leads me to my only gripe of this book There are simply too many people to keep track All of the different mostly Italian sounding names packed into this book will make your head spin It might be a good idea to take some notes while reading I know you shouldn’t feel like you’re back in school when reading something for enjoyment but it’s probably worth the trouble I wish this book would have included pictures ie illustrationspaintings of some of the key figures for ease of reference A family tree or two would have been majorly helpful as well Again way too many mistresses marriages cousins and allegiances between countries for the average brain to assimilate There is also tons of descriptions of weddings festivities and ceremonies as people enter and conuer cities I guess one must include such things if it was well known since ‘real’ history might be a tad scant from 500 years agoStill a great beginner’s guide to a famous family With a length of 300 pages there really isn’t too much detail to overwhelm you and get you completely lost I also now have a desire to learn about this family as well as the people and places that occupied this place and time in history And really isn’t that what a good history book is supposed to do?Note I should point out that the Borgia family are lead characters of the popular video game Assassin’s Creed II This is one of my favorite games of all time Although I’ve played through the game several times I never pay attention to “story” lines in video games I’m one of those grouchy old gamers who doesn’t give a rip about a story I play games to DO not to LEARN But if like me you loved Assassin’s Creed II this is probably a good primer to the real comings and goings of the family

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Christopher Hibberts latest history brings the family and the world they lived inthe glittering Rome of the Italian Renaissanceto lifeThe name Borgia is synonymous with the corruption nepotism and greed that were rife in Renaissance Italy The powerful voracious Rodrigo Borgia better known to history as Pope Alexander VI was the central figure of the dynasty Two of his seven papal offspring also rose to power and fameLucrezia Borgia his daughter whose husband was famously murdered by her brother and that brother Cesare who served as the model for Niccol Machiavellis The Prince Notorious for seizing power wealth land and titles through bribery marriage and murder the dynastys dramatic rise from its Spanish roots to its occupation of the highest position in Renaissance society forms a gripping tale Erudite witty and always insightful Hibbert removes the layers of myth around the Borgia family and creates a portrait alive with his superb sense of character and place Not the best book by Christopher Hibbert There is too much description of clothes pageantry and cavalcades which seem to facinate the author and too little about the context of what happened to this incredible family uite disappointing after reading the book on the Medici Nevertheless it is well written and agreeable

Mobi The Borgias and Their Enemies

The Borgias and Their Enemies 1431 1519Christopher Hibberts latest history brings the family and the world they lived inthe glittering Rome of the Italian Renaissanceto lifeThe name Borgia is synonymous with the corruption nepotism and greed that were rife in Renaissance Italy The powerful voracious Rodrigo Borgia better known to history as Pope Alexander VI was the central figure of the dynasty Two of his seven papal offspring also rose to power and fameLucrezia Borgia his daughter whose husband was famously murdered by her brother and that brother Cesare who served as the model for Niccol Machiavellis The Prince Notorious for seizing power wealth land and titles through bribery marriage and murder the dynastys dramatic rise from its Spanish roots to its occupation of the highest position in Renaissance society forms a gripping tale Erudite witty and always insightful Hibbert removes the layers of myth around the Borgia family and creates a portrait alive with his superb sense of character and place This book is a treasure for any enthusiast of the political struggles that were a signature of the Italian Renaissance Much like the Greek city states during antiuity Italian history during this time was dominated by the economics and political dynamics of Florence Milan and Italian states ruled by their own established political dynasties Florence had the de' Medici Milan had the Sforza given this backdrop the book shows how the Borgia family rising from Spanish roots made their way into Italian historyInstance after instance I enjoyed how the author managed to balance fact with legend tracing historical trajectory while using sources to tell us how the scholars and public percieved the driving personalities Instead of jumping straight into the career of Pope Alexander VI who became cardinal at 25 we're given a summary of then recent Papal history to give context to the realities that Rodrigo Borgia exploited to navigate his way into the papacy Horse trading amongst cardinals promises of posts and land were not unusual and Borgia merely mastered the art The way he is described is not far removed from what is expected from popular depictions he well knew how to dominate how to shine in conversation and how to impose his will on other men Instead of taking the oft taken one sided stance of dismissing his entire tenure as corrupt Hibbert is realistic guilty as he may well have been of simony bribery and sexual incontinence Alexander VI was both conscientious and competent in the discharge of his duties Approachable affable and good naturedGiven the giant mish mash that is family politics with family disputes political alliances and marriages the author captures a single dimension at a time so that the reader doesn't get overwhelmed or lost in the trivialities of learning family trees The chapters are short so that the book doesn't read like a drag on history book littered by facts and dates the commentary is what is given its due importanceThe Rome the Borgias inherited was struck by poverty far removed from the grandeur of Imperial Rome Alexander VI managed to balance the papal budget using income from aluminum mines on the political level he managed to escape the insecurity of the College of Cardinal's calling council to dispose him and diplomatically he gave a relatively minor concession to the French of allowing access through the papal states whilst avoiding an inevitable defeat had they gone to war against French canons A good observer would notice the creation of the marks of Borgia opulence that lie to this date decorated churches and palaces marked with great works of artCesare unlike his father who at least outside prided himself on following Christian rituals carried himself in clothes that were the doublets and hose of a secular prince not a man in holy orders The book makes a swift turn from documenting the life of Rodrigo his daughter Lucrezia a chief tool in securing alliances through marriage and Cesare's relatively incompetent brother Juan to Cesare's campaigns and successes It is not difficult to notice that major parts of history are compressed into small paragraphs such as the detailed histories of de' Medici Sforza the rise and fall of Savonarola but the beauty of this book lies in this incompleteness Firstly the book avoids going on tangents sticking to the facts that are relevant to Borgia history Secondly given that we are accustomed to dramatizations that fill in gaps where there is otherwise speculation and uncertainty the relative dearth of information has the indirect effect of shocking us about the extent of creative license taken by authors and directorsThe author does great service to Cesare's myth while also bursting his aura of infallibility From the Borgia nemeses Cardinal della Rovere the Duke is so endowed with prudence ability and every virtue of mind and body that he has conuered everybody The author wisely includes the famous assessments of Machiavelli in echoing the same views about his competence at realpolitik giving weight to the view that Cesare was the person in mind when writing the Prince to reseek the favor of the Medici's While Cesare fought for the sake of glory of acuiring landsacknowledging no fatigue or danger the downside of this ability to annex lands in his campaign meant that he was eager to seize states than to administer them To the author history isn't a list of conuests but the ability to make good use of those conuests At no point does the author seem to dive into describing campaigns without telling the reader about the monetary costs of the conflict and how the money was raised giving a realistic and complete account of the nature of warfare as an economic enterprise not merely a display of traditional heroismAny Borgia fan would love the life bringing descriptions of all dimensions of the family and their politics Lucrezia and her three marriages Cesare and his involvement with the French Cesare's response to the Orsini revolt in Urbino his diplomatic success with securing his French bride Charlotte d' Albert the French claim to Naples as a source of constant dilemma's to the Borgia's who were allied to Naples's incumbents The romantic affair with Cesare's life ends with the failure of his contingency plan upon the death of his father owing to his own illness and his fatal and poorly calculated mistake of helping della Rovere be elected foolishly thinking that he would forget his long standing enmity against the Borgia family and keep him as the head of the papal armies and maintain his hold on the Romagna Lucrezia's last moments at the court are also explored living her life as an obsolete political commodity until her deathA glance at the primary and secondary sources in the book give a good idea of how much material is taken from sources that describe the Italian Renaissance in its totality and not Borgia history isolation This perhaps gives the best example of the undeniable influence that the Borgia's had on art and culture Anyone who liked this book should grab a book on the history of the de' Medici and Sforza to get a broader picture of intra city state politicsThe book presents itself almost as a live show a great summary but by no means a concise historyA gripping read