Doc ì Machiavelli in Hell ✓ 512pages ✓ Join or create book clubs


Ebook Machiavelli in Hell

Doc ì Machiavelli in Hell ✓ 512pages ✓ Join or create book clubs ✓ ✅ Machiavelli in Hell PDF / Epub ⚣ Author Join or create book clubs – Eyltransferservices.co.uk Winner of the Pulitzer Prize In this intellectual biography Sebastian de Grazia presents a new vision of Gather power and coalesce into a unified vision of humankind and the world De Grazias achievement is to present a totally comprehensive view of Machiavelli mediated entirely through Machiavelli's own language Journal of Modern Histo Machiavelli is arguably the greatest philosophical chameleon in the history of Western Civilization He has been called the last of the medieval thinkers a typical civic humanist and the first of the moderns He has been declared the teacher of tyranny the champion of princes the defender of republics He has been identified as the inventor of the idea of reason of state and the advocate of the common goodHe has inspired great fogs of words to steal a nice phrase of Roberto Ridolfi's but few biographies As much as I like and admire the work being reviewed it is not a biography not even really an intellectual biography If you come here looking for a standard chronology go to Ridolfi's work; De Grazia's is episodic at best Do not rely on this book to make sense of the arc of Machiavelli's career his love affairs or of his domestic life You get snapshots of all these aspects of Machiavelli's life but there is no real focus on them no real detail presentedWhat you do get is a discursive argument that Machiavelli's thought has two foundations The first one is not too unusual Machiavelli's political philosophy is based on his understanding of the common good The second foundation is a bit idiosyncratic Machiavelli is best understood as a reformer of the Christian faithI disagree really with both convictions of De Grazia's but what I do not uestion is his scholarship in regards to the primary sources Dante Germino pointed out in a review back when De Grazia's book was first published that De Grazia has seemingly read every scrap of paper that Machiavelli ever scribbled on with his pen De Grazia has absorbed the major political works the poetry the plays and the papers that Machiavelli wrote during his work for the Florentine state De Grazia does all of his own translations from the Italian and provides the original uote in his notes What is weird is he cites no secondary sources whatsoever even when they are neededI would like to uote a passage from De Grazia's book about Machiavelli's conception of GodNiccolo's God is the creator the master deity providential real universal one of many names personal invocable thankable to be revered a judge just and forgiving rewarding and punishing awesome a force transcendent separate from but operative in the world De Grazia p 59I see most of De Grazia's book as an expansion and defense of this statement In his defense of it I believe that De Grazia relies entirely too much on An Exhortation to Penitence And yet I believe that this is a book that everyone interested in Machiavelli should read and learn from Why? For one thing De Grazia makes clear just how different the Christianity of that era was from ours There may be only one God but there were apparently a ton of lesser deities For example see pp 204 5 for a discussion of Fortune as a minister of God that occasionally when He isn't looking goes her own waySecondly De Grazia is focusing on one of the central uestions of interpretation that any reader dealing with Machiavelli has to answer How much did Machiavelli believe in God? How much of what he wrote was lip service? How much did he use the rhetorical tropes of his era to express or hide his thought? De Grazia has given us a sustained well thought out answer to these uestions that is based on the whole of Machiavelli's writings I just feel that by the time you understand all of the nuances of God that De Grazia would have Machiavelli believe in there isn't much of a Christian God left I happen to be okay with that whole lack of God thing and I believe Machiavelli was tooBut I learned a lot from De Grazia about Machiavelli and his times And I admire him greatly as an elegant writer And anyone who inspires someone to go actually read Machiavelli is a friend of mine

Machiavelli in HellGather power and coalesce into a unified vision of humankind and the world De Grazias achievement is to present a totally comprehensive view of Machiavelli mediated entirely through Machiavelli's own language Journal of Modern Histo Machiavelli is arguably the greatest philosophical chameleon in the history of Western Civilization He has been called the last of the medieval thinkers a typical civic humanist and the first of the moderns He has been declared the teacher of tyranny the champion of princes the defender of republics He has been identified as the inventor of the idea of reason of state and the advocate of the common goodHe has inspired great fogs of words to steal a nice phrase of Roberto Ridolfi's but few biographies As much as I like and admire the work being reviewed it is not a biography not even really an intellectual biography If you come here looking for a standard chronology go to Ridolfi's work; De Grazia's is episodic at best Do not rely on this book to make sense of the arc of Machiavelli's career his love affairs or of his domestic life You get snapshots of all these aspects of Machiavelli's life but there is no real focus on them no real detail presentedWhat you do get is a discursive argument that Machiavelli's thought has two foundations The first one is not too unusual Machiavelli's political philosophy is based on his understanding of the common good The second foundation is a bit idiosyncratic Machiavelli is best understood as a reformer of the Christian faithI disagree really with both convictions of De Grazia's but what I do not uestion is his scholarship in regards to the primary sources Dante Germino pointed out in a review back when De Grazia's book was first published that De Grazia has seemingly read every scrap of paper that Machiavelli ever scribbled on with his pen De Grazia has absorbed the major political works the poetry the plays and the papers that Machiavelli wrote during his work for the Florentine state De Grazia does all of his own translations from the Italian and provides the original uote in his notes What is weird is he cites no secondary sources whatsoever even when they are neededI would like to uote a passage from De Grazia's book about Machiavelli's conception of GodNiccolo's God is the creator the master deity providential real universal one of many names personal invocable thankable to be revered a judge just and forgiving rewarding and punishing awesome a force transcendent separate from but operative in the world De Grazia p 59I see most of De Grazia's book as an expansion and defense of this statement In his defense of it I believe that De Grazia relies entirely too much on An Exhortation to Penitence And yet I believe that this is a book that everyone interested in Machiavelli should read and learn from Why? For one thing De Grazia makes clear just how different the Christianity of that era was from ours There may be only one God but there were apparently a ton of lesser deities For example see pp 204 5 for a discussion of Fortune as a minister of God that occasionally when He isn't looking goes her own waySecondly De Grazia is focusing on one of the central uestions of interpretation that any reader dealing with Machiavelli has to answer How much did Machiavelli believe in God? How much of what he wrote was lip service? How much did he use the rhetorical tropes of his era to express or hide his thought? De Grazia has given us a sustained well thought out answer to these uestions that is based on the whole of Machiavelli's writings I just feel that by the time you understand all of the nuances of God that De Grazia would have Machiavelli believe in there isn't much of a Christian God left I happen to be okay with that whole lack of God thing and I believe Machiavelli was tooBut I learned a lot from De Grazia about Machiavelli and his times And I admire him greatly as an elegant writer And anyone who inspires someone to go actually read Machiavelli is a friend of mine

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Machiavelli in Hell º Winner of the Pulitzer Prize In this intellectual biography Sebastian de Grazia presents a new vision of Machiavelli that evokes with uncanny precision the great Florentine thinkers presence After providing an engrossing account of A uniue and brilliant book that blends creative inuiry with brilliant academic analysis Truly one of a kind in historical studies I wish academic studies were like it Doc è Machiavelli in Hell ✓ Join or create book clubs

Join or create book clubs ✓ Machiavelli in Hell Ebook

Join or create book clubs ✓ Machiavelli in Hell Ebook Machiavelli's childhood and the period following his imprisonment and torture the book turns to an examination of The Prince The details of Machiavellis life never cease to weave in and out of the narrative as we read how his ideas This is heavy readinghave to be in the mood to read this type of book I read it every so often especially when hearing political machiavellian tactics