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MOBI Ê DOC Inside the Gas Chambers ↠ EYLTRANSFERSERVICES ↠ [Reading] ➶ Inside the Gas Chambers: Eight Months in the Sonderkommando of Auschwitz By Join or create book clubs – Eyltransferservices.co.uk This is a uniue eye witness account of everyday life right at the heart of the Nazi exterminatiThis is a uniue eye witness account of everyday life right at the heart of the Nazi extermination machine Slomo Venezia was born into a poor Jewish Italian community living in Thessaloniki Greece At first the occupying Italians protected his family; but when the Germans invaded the Venezias were deported to Auschwitz His mother and sisters disappeared on arrival and he learned at first with disbelief that they had almost certainly been gassed Given the chance to earn a little extra bread he agreed to become a ‘Sonderkommando' without realising what this entailed He soon found himself a member of the ‘special unit' responsible for removing the corpses from the gas chambers and burning their bodies Dispassionately he details the grim round of daily tasks evokes the terror inspired by the man in charge of the crematoria ‘Angel of Death' Otto Moll and recounts the attempts made by some of the prisoners to escape including the revolt of October 1944 It is usual to imagine that none of those who went into the gas chambers at Auschwitz ever emerged to tell their tale but as a member of a ‘Sonderkommando' Shlomo Venezia was given this horrific privilege He knew that having witnessed the unspeakable he in turn would probably be eliminated by the SS in case he ever told his tale He survived this is his storyPublished in association with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum This book is the collected memories of Shlomo Venezia of his time in the crematorium sonderkommando work unit at Auschwitz Birkenau At first I found the uestion and answer format of the text somewhat distancing as the book records the conversations he had with an interviewer in 2006 Further the fact that his thoughts were put on paper in that year gave his memories a somewhat fragmentary feel However as I progressed through the book those points receded and his deeply disturbing experiences came to lifeSadly Shlomo Venezia died in October of 2012 at the age of 88NOTE If you can only read one testimonial of a crematoria sonderkommando worker I would recommend that you read Eyewitness Auschwitz Three Years in the Gas Chambers by Filip Muller He wrote this just a couple of years after he got out of the camp and has a coherent and direct feeling

Inside the Gas Chambers Eight Months in the Sonderkommando of AuschwitzThis is a uniue eye witness account of everyday life right at the heart of the Nazi extermination machine Slomo Venezia was born into a poor Jewish Italian community living in Thessaloniki Greece At first the occupying Italians protected his family; but when the Germans invaded the Venezias were deported to Auschwitz His mother and sisters disappeared on arrival and he learned at first with disbelief that they had almost certainly been gassed Given the chance to earn a little extra bread he agreed to become a ‘Sonderkommando' without realising what this entailed He soon found himself a member of the ‘special unit' responsible for removing the corpses from the gas chambers and burning their bodies Dispassionately he details the grim round of daily tasks evokes the terror inspired by the man in charge of the crematoria ‘Angel of Death' Otto Moll and recounts the attempts made by some of the prisoners to escape including the revolt of October 1944 It is usual to imagine that none of those who went into the gas chambers at Auschwitz ever emerged to tell their tale but as a member of a ‘Sonderkommando' Shlomo Venezia was given this horrific privilege He knew that having witnessed the unspeakable he in turn would probably be eliminated by the SS in case he ever told his tale He survived this is his storyPublished in association with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum This book is the collected memories of Shlomo Venezia of his time in the crematorium sonderkommando work unit at Auschwitz Birkenau At first I found the uestion and answer format of the text somewhat distancing as the book records the conversations he had with an interviewer in 2006 Further the fact that his thoughts were put on paper in that year gave his memories a somewhat fragmentary feel However as I progressed through the book those points receded and his deeply disturbing experiences came to lifeSadly Shlomo Venezia died in October of 2012 at the age of 88NOTE If you can only read one testimonial of a crematoria sonderkommando worker I would recommend that you read Eyewitness Auschwitz Three Years in the Gas Chambers by Filip Muller He wrote this just a couple of years after he got out of the camp and has a coherent and direct feeling

EBOOK Ó Eight Months in the Sonderkommando of Auschwitz ë Join or create book clubs

Inside the Gas Chambers: Eight Months in the Sonderkommando of Auschwitz Ñ This is a uniue eye witness account of everyday life right at the heart of the Nazi extermination machine Slomo Venezia was born into a poor Jewish Italian community living in Thessaloniki Greece At first the occupying Italians protected his family; but when the Germans invaded the Venezias were deported to Auschwitz His mother and sisters disappeared on arrival and he learned at first with disbelief that they had almost certainly been gassed Given the chance to earn a little extra bread he agreed to become a ‘Sonderkommando' without realising what this entailed He soon found himself a member of the ‘special unit' responsible for removing the corpses from the gas chambers and burning their bodies Dispassionately he details the grim round of daily tasks evokes the terror inspired by the man in charge of the crematoria ‘Angel of Death' Otto Moll and recounts the attempts made by some of the prisoners to escape including the revolt of October 1944 It is usual to imagine that none of those who went into the gas chambers at Auschwitz ever emerged to tell their tale but as a member of a ‘Sonderkommando' Shlomo Venezia was given this horrific privilege He knew that having witnessed the unspeakable he in turn would probably be eliminated by the SS in case he ever told his tale He survived this is his storyPublished in association with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum This book and others like it that give a glimpse into the world of pure horror created by the Nazis is both excruciating and absolutely necessay It is very easy for people who live in comfortable homes have access to good food water medical care libraries and normal life to say “never again” It is far less easy to read first hand accounts like Shlomo Venezia’s words and images that radically alter our perception But we must read accounts such as this because should there ever come a time when life is not easy when one’s access to food shelter and safety are scarce that is the time when our resolve of “never again” is truly tested To choose our common humanity over one’s own comforts and needs is to acknowledge that if we do not such atrocities could occur again This volume and many other biographical accounts all describe how the bystanders the majority of the time stood by often in silence choosing their own comforts and many times old prejudices and hate over their fellow men women and children So read these words and view these images So that if you or I are ever tested we choose to serve our common humanity over our individual hated wants or social prejudices EBOOK Ó Eight Months in the Sonderkommando of Auschwitz ë Join or create book clubs

Join or create book clubs ë Inside the Gas Chambers: Eight Months in the Sonderkommando of Auschwitz TEXT

Join or create book clubs ë Inside the Gas Chambers: Eight Months in the Sonderkommando of Auschwitz TEXT This is a uniue eye witness account of everyday life right at the heart of the Nazi extermination machine Slomo Venezia was born into a poor Jewish Italian community living in Thessaloniki Greece At first the occupying Italians protected his family; but when the Germans invaded the Venezias were deported to Auschwitz His mother and sisters disappeared on arrival and he learned at first with disbelief that they had almost certainly been gassed Given the chance to earn a little extra bread he agreed to become a ‘Sonderkommando' without realising what this entailed He soon found himself a member of the ‘special unit' responsible for removing the corpses from the gas chambers and burning their bodies Dispassionately he details the grim round of daily tasks evokes the terror inspired by the man in charge of the crematoria ‘Angel of Death' Otto Moll and recounts the attempts made by some of the prisoners to escape including the revolt of October 1944 It is usual to imagine that none of those who went into the gas chambers at Auschwitz ever emerged to tell their tale but as a member of a ‘Sonderkommando' Shlomo Venezia was given this horrific privilege He knew that having witnessed the unspeakable he in turn would probably be eliminated by the SS in case he ever told his tale He survived this is his storyPublished in association with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum The account of Shlomo Venezia is one of the most striking and above honest from Auschwitz He did not try to sanitize his account claiming Hollywood style heroics He freely admitted that the victims were also competitors They had to fight for each piece of bread in order to survive and he too was forced to steal a piece of bread from another prisoner This was nothing in relation to the horrors he faced in the camp looking into the eyes of live victims who he knew would shortly be dead He didn't just have to deal with dead bodies he had to deal with bodies still warm and in some cases the bodies of his family and friends Shlomo was certainly a victim and yet knowing that through his forced labour he was a cog in the machinery of murder creates in him feeling of complicity or even collaboration in mass murder He feels guilt although he understands he was not responsible He also illustrates that there were prisons who used slightly privileged position to become masters of other prisons and in some cases committing murder were these prisoners still victims or already perpetrators? Shlomo even asks himself if he was forced to kill someone what would he do ? The horrors he describes show that simplistic division of good and evil was totally inadeuate and even monsters had moments proving their humanityThis is a very personal account but also an important historical document