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ePub × mobi Michelangelo í God's Architect Free â Join or create book clubs ↠ ☃ [PDF / Epub] ☂ Michelangelo, God's Architect: The Story of His Final Years and Greatest Masterpiece By Join or create book clubs ✑ – Eyltransferservices.co.uk In this audiobook In this audiobook acclaimed actor Simon Callow narrates the gripping untold story of Michelangelo's final decades and his transformation into one of the greatest architects of the Italian Renaissance As he entered his 70s the great Italian Renaissance artist Michelangelo despaired that his productive years were past Anguished by the death of friends and discouraged by the loss of commissions to younger artists this supreme painter and sculptor began carving his own tomb It was at this unlikely moment that fate intervened to task Michelangelo with the most ambitious and daunting project of his long creative lifeMichelangelo God's Architect is the first book to tell the full story of Michelangelo's final two decades when the peerless artist refashioned himself into the master architect of St Peter’s Basilica and other major buildings When the Pope handed Michelangelo control of the St Peter’s project in 1546 it was a study in architectural mismanagement plagued by flawed design and faulty engineering Assessing the situation with his uncompromising eye and razor sharp intellect Michelangelo overcame the furious resistance of church officials to persuade the Pope that it was time to start over Leading Michelangelo expert William Wallace sheds new light on this least familiar part of Michelangelo’s biography revealing a creative genius who was also a skilled engineer and enterprising businessman The challenge of building St Peter’s deepened Michelangelo’s faith Wallace shows Fighting the intrigues of church politics and his own declining health Michelangelo became convinced that he was destined to build the largest and most magnificent church ever conceived And he was determined to live long enough that no other architect could alter his design William E Wallace is the Barbara Murphy Bryant distinguished professor of art history at Washington University in St Louis His books include Discovering Michelangelo The Art Lover's Guide to Understanding Michelangelo's Masterpieces Michelangelo The Artist the Man and His Times and Michelangelo at San Lorenzo PLEASE NOTE When you purchase this title the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio Interesting book about Michelangelo Photographs were an added gift within the book While reading this book you really feel you are in Italy with Michelangelo Great conversation piece

Join or create book clubs Á The Story of His Final Years and Greatest Masterpiece pdf

In this audiobook acclaimed actor Simon Callow narrates the gripping untold story of Michelangelo's final decades and his transformation into one of the greatest architects of the Italian Renaissance As he entered his 70s the great Italian Renaissance artist Michelangelo despaired that his productive years were past Anguished by the death of friends and discouraged by the loss of commissions to younger artists this supreme painter and sculptor began carving his own tomb It was at this unlikely moment that fate intervened to task Michelangelo with the most ambitious and daunting project of his long creative lifeMichelangelo God's Architect is the first book to tell the full story of Michelangelo's final two decades when the peerless artist refashioned himself into the master architect of St Peter’s Basilica and other major buildings When the Pope handed Michelangelo control of the St Peter’s project in 1546 it was a study in architectural mismanagement plagued by flawed design and faulty engineering Assessing the situation with his uncompromising eye and razor sharp intellect Michelangelo overcame the furious resistance of church officials to persuade the Pope that it was time to start over Leading Michelangelo expert William Wallace sheds new light on this least familiar part of Michelangelo’s biography revealing a creative genius who was also a skilled engineer and enterprising businessman The challenge of building St Peter’s deepened Michelangelo’s faith Wallace shows Fighting the intrigues of church politics and his own declining health Michelangelo became convinced that he was destined to build the largest and most magnificent church ever conceived And he was determined to live long enough that no other architect could alter his design William E Wallace is the Barbara Murphy Bryant distinguished professor of art history at Washington University in St Louis His books include Discovering Michelangelo The Art Lover's Guide to Understanding Michelangelo's Masterpieces Michelangelo The Artist the Man and His Times and Michelangelo at San Lorenzo PLEASE NOTE When you purchase this title the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio Very good but repetitive in many places

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Michelangelo God's Architect The Story of His Final Years and Greatest MasterpieceIn this audiobook acclaimed actor Simon Callow narrates the gripping untold story of Michelangelo's final decades and his transformation into one of the greatest architects of the Italian Renaissance As he entered his 70s the great Italian Renaissance artist Michelangelo despaired that his productive years were past Anguished by the death of friends and discouraged by the loss of commissions to younger artists this supreme painter and sculptor began carving his own tomb It was at this unlikely moment that fate intervened to task Michelangelo with the most ambitious and daunting project of his long creative lifeMichelangelo God's Architect is the first book to tell the full story of Michelangelo's final two decades when the peerless artist refashioned himself into the master architect of St Peter’s Basilica and other major buildings When the Pope handed Michelangelo control of the St Peter’s project in 1546 it was a study in architectural mismanagement plagued by flawed design and faulty engineering Assessing the situation with his uncompromising eye and razor sharp intellect Michelangelo overcame the furious resistance of church officials to persuade the Pope that it was time to start over Leading Michelangelo expert William Wallace sheds new light on this least familiar part of Michelangelo’s biography revealing a creative genius who was also a skilled engineer and enterprising businessman The challenge of building St Peter’s deepened Michelangelo’s faith Wallace shows Fighting the intrigues of church politics and his own declining health Michelangelo became convinced that he was destined to build the largest and most magnificent church ever conceived And he was determined to live long enough that no other architect could alter his design William E Wallace is the Barbara Murphy Bryant distinguished professor of art history at Washington University in St Louis His books include Discovering Michelangelo The Art Lover's Guide to Understanding Michelangelo's Masterpieces Michelangelo The Artist the Man and His Times and Michelangelo at San Lorenzo PLEASE NOTE When you purchase this title the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio About a month after Michelangelo's death Jacopo da Castiglione wagon driver delivered four marble columns bases and capitals to the construction site of the new Church of Santa Maria delgi Angeli being built within the ruins of the ancient Roman Baths of Diocletian This was unusual Records from the time show purchases of raw materials including bricks volcanic sand tufa travertine and lime all likely brought from uarry sources rather than having been plundered from the remains of the ancient city itself Mining the local ruins would have been far less expensive but as far back as the Fifth Century rule of Theodoric the Great rulers of Rome had defended the preservation of what remained of the ruined city as a means of attaching themselves to the grandeur of classical Rome thus asserting their legitimacy as Rome's current rulers On the relentless centuries long program of burning marble for lime and melting bronze treasures for raw metal Robert Hughes writes “The Romans had done damage to Rome than the worst barbarian invasions”From the early 14th century Rome's civic government considered the preservation andor restoration of antiue architecture a primary duty but after the return of the Holy See in 1420 these civic governors began to lose control of these duties to papal authority Thus it was that when in 1561 Pope Pius IV decided to build a new church using the Baths of Diocletian as a sort of shell authority over the ruins was asserted whole He turned the project over to Michelangelo The first construction records were issued April 1563 Michelangelo had only ten months to live Yet in that time he swiftly designed an inventive new church within the ruins and did so with what appears to be a severe understanding of the necessity to do as little as possible to the ancient structure and to acuire new materials not by despoiling surrounding ruins rich in building materials but to stick to the now centuries old respect for the ruins of Rome and acuire his construction materials fresh from the groundThis respect for the ancient had uses other than political The idea of bringing ancient structures back to life was consonant with the Christian concept of the resurrection of the body and while Michelangelo rapidly approaching a long dreaded death respected the ethos of renovation it is possible that he also understood it as a personal metaphor for his own mortality But as soon as Michelangelo was no longer around to stop them others less concerned with the idea of the conservation of old Rome uickly turned to pillaging nearby ruins again as the story of Jacopo the wagoneer’s delivery of marble columns and capitals tells usMichelangelo had not stayed in school long enough to learn to read Latin or Greek and he seems to have been bothered by this William E Wallace's new book Michelangelo God's Architect makes it clear that the artist was solicitous of the refined group of friends he spent time with This small observation encapsulates one of Wallace's personal missions to rescue Michelangelo from the myth that has grown up around him casting him as a grouchy depressed loner friendless and in some observers' views even diagnosable I can say it no better that Paul Barolsky “Although Michelangelo was a real person he nevertheless exists in our imagination largely as a mythic being We do not much think of the real Michelangelo for example eating with pleasure the marzolino cheese sausages ravioli beans and choice pears that his nephew in fact sent to him in Rome”In his Michelangelo The Artist the Man and His Times and Michelangelo at San Lorenzo The Genius as Entrepreneur Wallace established Michelangelo as an engineer and project manager able to organize and motivate large work crews committed to huge architectural undertakings which reuires fine people skills This was no stormy curmudgeon At home with bricklayers and popes uarrymen and Dukes Michelangelo was anything but the caricature that history beginning with Vasari has made of himWallace asserts that Michelangelo became an architect with his design of the ill fated facade for Florence's Church of San Lorenzo but he begins with a spirited defense of the final version of the Tomb of Julius II While this tomb is generally dismissed by the likes of Timothy Clifford as an “appalling mess” and Timothy Verdon as “an amazing humiliation” and even counted in Condivi's biography of the artist as “the tragedy of the tomb” which biography is generally thought to have been essentially dictated to Condivi by Michelangelo himself Wallace imagines the final evening of the tomb's completion the artist lingering at the site in the church of San Pietro in Vincoli “Did it bother the artist that the tomb erected in San Pietro in Vincoli was significantly different from what he had first conceived? After four decades and innumerable delays Michelangelo finally had created a decorous and moving monument—grand rather than grandiose inspired by Christian sentiment than pagan ambition” Wallace then notes that Michelangelo was seventy years oldIn the online magazine MarketWatch Wallace published in November 2019 the spine stiffening essay “Michelangelo Found a New Career after 70 — Why Can’t You?” He concludes “Thanks to what Michelangelo accomplished in his final years Rome once again could claim its place as the capital of the world—