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Beyond the Coffee Shop Riding 1970s Moto Guzzi Motorcycles in Northern CanadaCanada is blessed with thousands of kilometers of empty roads which seem to wind on forever through forested hills and between still blue lakes What better way to explore them than by riding 40 year old Italian motorbikes famous for their dodgy electrics and sparse dealer network? Forty year old bikes aged rider thousands of kilometers of virtually unserviced empty roads in the middle of bearwolfand blackfly infested wilderness what could possibly go wrong? Fess up time; although I've never met Nick we have a common interest in the Nuovo Falcone and old Guzzis in general and have communicated on line so this review is not entirely unbiasedNick Adams is already known to the online community being an itinerant contributor to several publications and a regular in Facebook circles As he says himself much of the content of this book may be familiar if you already follow his writings on any of the many forums to which he contributes as the book is primarily a compilation of these but it’s presented in a form that reads as a real book rather than a collection of unconnected anecdotes There’s an amusing opening section where you learn of Nick’s introduction to the world of motorcycling that will strike a chord with many readers of that certain age It certainly did with me although Nick is far adventurous than most and this clearly became entrenched at an early age His love of long distance riding with the minimum possible resources existed from the start and long before passion of another sort drew him across the Atlantic to Canada where he remains to this day We all know Canada and superficially it seems not too dissimilar to the United States with its big cities fat cars and freeways Different but somehow the same to the uninitiated eye That similarity is only skin deep though and much as we in Scotland can ride north and find ourselves in unpopulated spots wild windy and apparently vast they pall into complete insignificance compared with the Canadian boreal forests lakes and tundra Through those never ending forests run roads but in sharp contrast to the potholes and relatively benign tarmac of the A9 most are of packed dirt or worse packed dirt surfaced by deep and loose gravel with the consistency of ball bearings You can ride for 1000 miles and see no sign of life apart from caribou moose and bears I had a much smaller experience of wilderness in Sweden a sort of miniature Canada when I foolishly decided to drive into the forest armed only with a VW Santana hire car a young wife and the sketchy and wholly useless map provided by the rental company After several hours of driving through a never ending tunnel of trees with no view whatsoever of anything but the gravel road in front and the dust cloud behind we discovered the limitations of our map when the road entered a deserted clearing completely surrounded by a menacing sea of spruce with the fuel gauge reading perilously low We did manage to retrace our route as midsummer twilight fell but we also still imagine some Lars and Anna yomping through the forest and discovering our bleached bones half buried in the pine needles given that nobody including us knew where we were Sweden north of Stockholm and away from the coastal towns seems much like the Canadian wilderness but where even lightly populated Sweden has 21 people per suare kilometre Canada has a mere 35 To put that in perspective Scotland has 65 with even the lowest populated Highland region overly crowded at 8 You’re on your own in Canada the mobile phone signal on which we’ve all come to depend is way out of range and your choice of steed is not some Bavarian overlander but a 40 year old slice of Italian eccentricity dressed up as a motorcycle and a motorcycle that was designed for the tree lined Boulevards and highways of the Mediterranean or California not for the territory of lumberjacks and such It sounds insane but this entertaining romp through the forests and lakes brings you to the realisation that ancient bikes make a lot sense in the wilderness than those ‘adventure bikes’ supposedly designed for the purpose A long wheelbase low centre of gravity and stump pulling torue provide stability in the gravel and although your toolkit needs to be a little comprehensive than bungees and duct tape at least your bike is made from things that are capable of being fixed on the verge without the need for plug in diagnostics and the discard and replace mentality on which modern machines depend Air cooling and carburettors and points keep things simple and in the wilderness simple is good Carrying extra fuel and oil is second nature as there won’t be a petrol station for several hundred miles and as Nick discovers you need to know how to use your tyre levers The road will rise from frost heave or disappear altogether where spring floods have deposited it into the nearest lake but it is these incidents that punctuate Nick’s journeys along with the characters he meets along the way In this book Nick takes you along the less travelled path taken by those few who are satisfied with their own company and capable of entering that rare Zen like state that enables them to endure or even enjoy the hours of featureless woodland streaming by on either side broken only by crystal clear lakes and the occasional mountain range Seemingly surviving on a diet of coffee and Cheetos Nick rides his ’72 Eldorado supplemented by a 750S of mysterious origins and a ’74 Nuovo Falcone Militare which he admits is easier on the ball bearings than even the Eldorado through the wilds of Ontario uebec Labrador and even Newfoundland Although a few photos are dotted throughout you don’t really need them as Nick’s descriptive prose creates a vivid picture as you join him on this selection of his many journeys It’s good to experience this from the comfort of your armchair dram clutched in your warm fingers and remember that the author is of the type whose idea of a good holiday away from home is to head back to the UK and scramble over the slick rocks of the moors and mountains in the horizontal sleet of winter while travelling by rented Royal Enfield in sub zero conditions Nick is not cut from the same cloth as a business suit and his writings are all the better for it Available for Kindle or on classic bound paper

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read Beyond the Coffee Shop kindle Ï Paperback ☆ nick adams È ❰Reading❯ ➶ Beyond the Coffee Shop: Riding 1970s Moto Guzzi Motorcycles in Northern Canada Author Nick Adams – Eyltransferservices.co.uk Canada is blessed with thousands of kilometers of empty roads which seem to wind onCanada is blessed with thousands of kilometers of empty roads which seem to wind on forever through forested hills and between still blue lakes What better way to explore them than by riding 40 year old Italian motorbikes famous for their dodgy electrics and sparse dealer network? Forty year old bikes aged rider thousands of kilometers of virtually unserviced empty roads in the middle of bearwolfand blackfly infested wilderness what could possibly go wrong? Eat your hearts out Ewan and Charlie you boys have a lot to learn from Nick riding alone with no back up team in terrain that could be fatal in the event of a mishap or breakdown Nick you are my hero being about your age slightly older and considering that I was doing ok riding my Mz's at the approach to 70 on the potholes roads of GB I thoroughly enjoyed your style of writing and your photo's and description of the flora and fauna Just wish I was brave enough to do the same Excellent reading hope it's not a one off

Nick Adams ô Beyond the Coffee Shop: Riding 1970s Moto Guzzi Motorcycles in Northern Canada text

Canada is blessed with thousands of kilometers of empty roads which seem to wind on forever through forested hills and between still blue lakes What better way to explore them than by riding 40 year old Italian motorbikes famous for their dodgy electrics and sparse dealer network? Forty year old bikes aged rider thousands of kilometers of virtually unserviced empty roads in the middle of bearwolfand blackfly infested wilderness what could possibly go wrong? British born Nick followed his heart to the New World several decades ago established a career in archaeology and then did the whole family thing He never lost a love of motorcycling on rattling old clunks through windswept wide open terrain which he developed back in his youth in Blighty In later life he made time and devoted resources to rediscover the exuisite loneliness of the long distance riderThese compiled episodes tell some of the stories of his travels Nick’s a natural storyteller He has a real gift for transporting you to the icy wilds of northern Canada where immense lakes look like inland oceans and the horizon hides behind ancient forests Nick takes an old bike one which doesn’t have a particularly brilliant reputation for reliability and proves that you can motor many thousands of miles on a 1972 Guzzi Eldorado without back up breakdown cover or even a mobile phone signal Sometimes his routes are paved or tarmac surfaced Often they’re notThe story starts with a bit of history about Nick’s early motorcycling years which will feel familiar to many men of a certain age It’s not just background; these formative years have a direct relevance to recent events Nick’s teenage experience with a the Red Panther which expired in the rain comes back to haunt him when his Guzzi likewise loses its sparks in heavy traffic – and in both occasions a brush with the law is the resultNick has a gift for dragging you into the ride This is less like a travelogue and like sharing the ride You could if you were truly keen recreate his routes by following the short road notations or detailed maps but I preferred to instead let the rhythm of his writing recreate the rumble of the roadEach ride is presented in a self contained chapter so this is an easy book to read in half hour sessions There is a bit of repetition especially when it comes to Nick’s firm grip on the French language but every journey has a distinct character – becoming adventurous as Nick’s confidence in the bike and his stamina grows He describes some situations common to many motorcycle travellers pressing on past what looked like a busy hotel only to end up in a dump of a motel a hundred miles later exhausted Refusing the stop for anything on the home straight and finishing a 22 hour trek in a state of wired hyper real concentration Worrying about that rattle Spending half the time with your head inclined towards the engineMore precious are the moments I’ve never experienced beautifully described Pulling up by the side of the road and hanging a hammock to sleep under the stars Being woken by the full moon I truly do relate to that and rather than restlessly fretting getting back in the saddle to ride a few hundred miles before breakfast dimply lit by the glow of 40 year old Italian electrics And even in the genuine honest to goodness middle of nowhere Nick encounters that essential motorcycling truth He meets strangers and they part as friendsCriticisms? A good editor would’ve tidied up the few grammatical and punctuation glitches but they rarely spoil the flow Bonuses? The photos of the deserted roads the sparsely visited rest stops and the sheer scale of the landscape810