MOBI ↠ DOC The Emperor of All Maladies A Biography of CancerFREE ½ EYLTRANSFERSERVICES


EBOOK The Emperor of All Maladies A Biography of Cancer

MOBI ↠ DOC The Emperor of All Maladies A Biography of Cancer FREE ½ EYLTRANSFERSERVICES Ð [Read] ➳ The Emperor of All Maladies A Biography of Cancer ➯ Siddhartha Mukherjee – Eyltransferservices.co.uk Alternate Cover Edition ISBN 1439107955 ISBN13 978143910795Ian ueen Atossa whose Greek slave cut off her malignant breast to the nineteenth century recipients of primitive radiation and chemotherapy to Mukherjee’s own leukemia patient Carla The Emperor of All Maladies is about the people who have soldiered through fiercely demanding regimens in order to survive and to increase our understanding of this iconic disease Riveting urgent and surprising The Emperor of All Maladies provides a fascinating glimpse into the future of cancer treatments It is an illuminating book that provides hope and clarity to those seeking to demystify cancer The author is a cancer physician and researcher I don't think anyone else could take on the challenge of writing about cancer from the first rearing of its ugly head He gives us a sweeping look at the beginning treatments trials operations and research Leukemia breast cancer Hodgkin's and other cancers flit in and out throughout this book Reading about children with this horrible disease always tears at my heart I think this was the hardest part Although it was all uite hard but so informativeHow doctors think at times when confronted with patients they are not sure they can cure There is so much included in this book but it is done well Written well and definitely kept my interestThe narrator was Fred Sanders and he was terrific

The Emperor of All Maladies A Biography of CancerIan ueen Atossa whose Greek slave cut off her malignant breast to the nineteenth century recipients of primitive radiation and chemotherapy to Mukherjee’s own leukemia patient Carla The Emperor of All Maladies is about the people who have soldiered through fiercely demanding regimens in order to survive and to increase our understanding of this iconic disease Riveting urgent and surprising The Emperor of All Maladies provides a fascinating glimpse into the future of cancer treatments It is an illuminating book that provides hope and clarity to those seeking to demystify cancer The author is a cancer physician and researcher I don't think anyone else could take on the challenge of writing about cancer from the first rearing of its ugly head He gives us a sweeping look at the beginning treatments trials operations and research Leukemia breast cancer Hodgkin's and other cancers flit in and out throughout this book Reading about children with this horrible disease always tears at my heart I think this was the hardest part Although it was all uite hard but so informativeHow doctors think at times when confronted with patients they are not sure they can cure There is so much included in this book but it is done well Written well and definitely kept my interestThe narrator was Fred Sanders and he was terrific

EPUB ¶ The Emperor of All Maladies A Biography of Cancer ñ Siddhartha Mukherjee

The Emperor of All Maladies A Biography of Cancer Ò Alternate Cover Edition ISBN 1439107955 ISBN13 9781439107959 The Emperor of All Maladies is a magnificent profoundly humane “biography” of cancer from its first documented appearances thousands of years ago through the epic battles in the twentieth century to cure control and conuer it to a radical new understanding of its essence Physician researcher and award winning science writer Siddhartha Mukherjee examines cancer with a cellular biologist’s precision a historian’s perspective and a biographer’s passion The result is an astonishingly lucid and elouent chronicle o Every year there's always one non fiction book that the entire literate world raves about and that I hate In 2009 it was Richard Holmes's The Age of Wonder the following year it was The Emperor of All MaladiesUniversally admired winner of a Pulitzer prize this book annoyed me so profoundly when I first read it that I've had to wait almost a year to be able to write anything vaguely coherent about it The flaws that I found so infuriating a year ago seem less important upon a second reading Though I still think it is a poorly conceived book executed in a manner that lacks all restraint it's nowhere near as terrible as I remembered As I recall the aspects of the book that most annoyed me werea the author's anthropomorphism of cancer a stupid unhelpful and ineffective metaphor In general I detest this practice of attributing personalities to diseases Perhaps it's a necessary psychological strategy for oncologists But it's particularly inappropriate in the case of cancer as it perpetuates the incorrect belief that cancer is a single disease as opposed to a shape shifting disease of colossal diversity For the same reason it makes little sense to speak of a war on cancer as if it were a sentient villain with plans for world domination one that can somehow be vanuished if we just find the magic formula Mukherjee correctly deplores this view as simplistic and reductive but he then proceeds to adopt it hook line and sinker It's a baffling and unfortunate choice because its inherent deficiencies lead to a kind of narrative incoherence as well as a damaging lack of clarity about the nature and scope of the book It's a symptom of Mukherjee's vagueness of purpose that he often refers to the book as a biography of cancer as if that phrase had meaningb A complete fatal inability to leave anything out There is a certain type of non fiction writer who seems hellbent on inflicting everything he or she learned while researching the book on the misfortunate reader No detail is spared Everyone the author spoke to during the five years researching the book gets a mention it would seem As do a bunch of dead folks some of them very dead not all clearly particularly relevantIf by doing this the author is trying to impress with the breadth of his research then he fails Leaving everything in is the simple intellectually lazy option Where non fiction is concerned the reader has a right to expect the author to take the trouble to shape his material into some kind of coherent whole recognizing that while some details are critical others are not and pruning accordingly All too often though authors forget this Their enthusiasm about the subject leads them to lose perspective the reader needs the whole story and will be thirsting for all the gory details; it would be criminal to leave anything outWell actually NO We want you the author to point out to us what's important and what's not c The author includes stories of his own patients' experience with cancers of various types I have nothing against this per se it's entirely sensible to do so However it reuires delicacy and finesse to report on his patients' stories without seeming exploitative or emotionally manipulative Writers like Jerome Groopman and Oliver Sachs regularly navigate this terrain with grace and sensitivity Mukherjee a much less experienced writer repeatedly crosses the line into bathos and melodrama The language is overly dramatic; one senses also that Mukherjee succumbs to the oncologist's fallacy of believing that cancer is intrinsically worse or serious than all other ailments Actually I guess that's already evident from the book's titled He has a particularly unfortunate habit of prefacing each chapter with at least one literary uote and when the book reaches a new section there are six in all he tends to go hog wild and give us a whole page of uotes These seem like a minor distraction at first but their cumulative effect is to leave the reader with the impression that i it is very important to the author to let the world know that he is a well read Renaissance dude ii chances are the author is a bit of a poser The bard the bible St Thomas Auinas Sophocles Kafka Hegel Voltaire Plato Sun Tzu and William Blake are all mined for a portentous snippet or two about mortality and the evils that the flesh is heir to Not to mention Gertrude Stein Jack London Czeslaw Milosz WH Auden Hilaire Belloc DH Lawrence Lewis Carroll Conan Doyle Italo Calvino Woody Allen Solzhenitsyn Akhmatova Using just the right uote to frame an argument or introduce a topic can be an extremely effective device but its effectiveness diminishes rapidly with overuse One gets the distinct impression that the author ransacked some uotation website in the mistaken idea that sprinkling them copiously throughout the manuscript would magically confer some kind of gravitas I reached my eye rolling moment on page 190 introducing part three when Doctor Mukherjee felt impelled to uote TS Eliot I have seen the Eternal Footman hold my coat and snickerAnd in short I was afraid e As I mentioned I think the structure and organization of the material leaves much to be desired The writing is generally adeuate if a little verbose though one tic of the author's drove me nuts Each of the apparently infinite number of characters in the book is introduced in Mukherjee's characteristically breezy style then immediately fixed in amber by means of a trio of adjectives Accurate information about the personality and character of many of these historical characters being limited one suspects that these adjective triplets may well have been chosen at random from a thesaurus This kind of thingchildless socially awkward and notoriously reclusivewealthy politically savvy and well connectedw EPUB ¶ The Emperor of All Maladies A Biography of Cancer ñ Siddhartha Mukherjee

Siddhartha Mukherjee ñ The Emperor of All Maladies A Biography of Cancer KINDLE

Siddhartha Mukherjee ñ The Emperor of All Maladies A Biography of Cancer KINDLE F a disease humans have lived with and perished from for than five thousand years The story of cancer is a story of human ingenuity resilience and perseverance but also of hubris paternalism and misperception Mukherjee recounts centuries of discoveries setbacks victories and deaths told through the eyes of his predecessors and peers training their wits against an infinitely resourceful adversary that just three decades ago was thought to be easily vanuished in an all out “war against cancer” The book reads like a literary thriller with cancer as the protagonist From the Pers This is personal Cancer entered my life uninvited trying to consume the body of my daughter Aria It was January 2008 when I heard the words “We think she has leukemia” She was four years oldIn the prologue of “The Emperor of All Maladies—A Biography of Cancer” by Siddartha Mukherjee he wrote “the arrival of a patient with acute leukemia still sends a shiver down the hospital’s spine—all the way from the cancer wards on its upper floors to the clinical laboratories buried deep in the basement Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells—cancer in one of its most explosive violent incarnations” What caught my attention was the word ‘still’ Leukemia happens to be one of the successful cancers in terms lengthy high uality remissions and even cure yet stillCancer governed every facet of our lives throughout her chemotherapy treatment which lasted 794 days followed by 90 days of continued maintenance antibiotics antacids and anti nausea medication She was lucky Trust me you CAN imagine my relief my sense of humility my inexpressible gratitude and my continued fear of its returnThat fear is now what governs me and it is an awful burden to carry I have discovered many things but there are two worth mentioning I’ve discovered that one can have fear and be unafraid and I have learned that cancer is indeed Death It may not always bring physical death but it always brings the death of a life once lived Deeply held convictions die The illusion of control is smothered Friendships and relationships wither Its victims are forever scarred with raw oozing reminders Pure and simple it is a scary way to have to live lifeSo as part of survivorship I committed myself to figuring out how to have this fear and be unafraid No doubt about it information is everything There was no way I would have been able to read this book during Aria’s treatment and I’m not certain I would have been able to read it had she died It is only upon the perch of her wellness that I can dig deep into the darkest corners of cancer and extract understandingI hold this book this gem like a shield of valor as I continue to face the beast that is cancer—even in remission it’s there “The Emperor of All Maladies” has empowered and humbled me Dr Mukherjee writes with grace and elegance about a topic that strikes fear like little else and takes the reader from a horrifying history the effects of which still linger and haunt to the fever pitched decades of discovery experimentation fearlessness and compassion to where we are now which I am convinced is the cusp of medicine’s finest hourThe early experimentation with cytotoxic therapies following WWII on young leukemia patients was particularly impressive for obvious reasons Three of those early identified successful agents are the very ones Aria had in addition to 5 other cocktails I am indebted to those researchers I am indebted to the parents of the children whose lives hung in balance of life and death for the sake of an unknown future I’m indebted to those childrenIt is overwhelming to consider that this exuisite and brilliant person decided to tackle medicine from its ‘humors’ to the ‘genome atlas’ detailing every twist and turn in between all the while tenderly weaving in the real life stories of real life peopleWe are on other side of cancer I would like nothing than to tell you that I feel safe I do not Every step I take I hear the echoed voices of the thousands of children who perished in order that my daughter’s life would be spared Still it wasn’t until I read the last few chapters of this book that I felt tangibly hopeful I won’t lie Those chapters were hard to digest It would be easy to dismiss them criticizing Dr Mukherjee for losing steam or failing to keep non medical people engaged but this would be a gross injustice to what I think was beautifully accomplished Namely our understanding of cancer is at the genetic level where just a mere 100 years ago blood and its constituents were identified and understood Now we can get into those individual cells and understand and map the universe within them I am in awe of this science and I am deeply profoundly indebted to Dr Mukherjee for explaining it to me Yes to me I told you this was personalHe doesn’t over simplify because the complexity of what we know now and continue to uestion and understand can’t be toned down cut away or reduced for easier swallowing in the layman’s mouth Cancer in all of its presentation is almost impossible to stomach and so these last chapters reuire the highest degree of concentration attention and care It is the place where anyone suffering the effects of cancer or fearing cancer can grasp a firm thread of promiseWhen I read the last sentence “In that haunted last night hanging on to her life by no than a tenuous thread summoning all her strength and dignity as she wheeled herself to the privacy of her bathroom it was as if she had encapsulated the essence of a four thousand year old war” I closed the book brought it to my chest and smiled This is an old battle This is a known battle This is a battle for which I was called to arms as witness to the battle my daughter fought This is a battle that continues to terrify me This is a battle that I can face with confidence despite my fear This is a battle that will remain but with weapons like the minds of Dr Mukherjee and others this is a battle whose field will continue to shift in the favor of human well being and dignity Thank you Dr Mukherjee On behalf of my family I bow deeply