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read Christianity kindle ✓ The First Three Thousand Years · eyltransferservices î ❄ [KINDLE] ✽ Christianity: The First Three Thousand Years By Diarmaid MacCulloch ➝ – Eyltransferservices.co.uk The National Book Critics Circle Award winning author of The ReformSus' message spread and how the New Testament was formed We follow the Christian story to all corners of the globe filling in often neglected accounts of conversions and confrontations in Africa and Asia And we discover the roots of the faith that galvanized America charting the rise of the evangelical movement from its origins in Germany and England This book encompasses all of intellectual history we meet monks and crusaders heretics and saints slave traders and abolitionists and discover Christianity's essential role in driving the enlightenment and the age of exploration and shaping This is a work of remarkable scholarship and erudition staggeringly comprehensive & packed with characters ideas isms and schisms than anyone could possibly remember What it doesn't do is discuss the emotional and spiritual benefits which religious people presumably get from their faith It is very much a bureaucratic history of the organisational and power structures of Christianity over the millennia and that focus brings a number of issues to the fore i The extent to which a religion's spread is dependent on the support of militarily and economically successful temporal power ii The sheer scale of the time and manpower devoted to attempting to impose uniformity of thought on a range of issues which by their very nature are unknowable iii The extent to which core Christian beliefs and practices were developed long after Christ's lifetime in response to changing geographical and historical circumstances iv The remarkable triviality of many of the issues over which Christians have been ready to hate fight and kill one another Is Christ one personality in two forms or two personalities one human and one divine? Does the Holy Spirit proceed from God and Christ or from God alone? Is there a Trinity and if so what is the pecking order within it? Is Mary the mother of the world? Should the host be elevated? v The strangeness of many of the concepts at the heart of the Christian message sin grace salvation and particularly the weird obsession which seems to be one of the constant themes of the history as MacCulloch tells it with the end days and the apocalysperapture which so many people appear to have been imminently anticipating and hoping for since the time of Jesus Watching the history unfold over than 1000 pages the reader wonders whether to admire Christianity as a structure for preserving scholarship and knowledge and civility through centuries of turmoil and strife or to look on horrified at the waste of so much time and effort and resource on arguing over unanswerable uestions The way MacCulloch tells it it almost seems that mankind was offered a choice 2000 years ago between the approaches of Aristotle based on learning from observation of the reality of the material world and Jesus based on assumptions about the nature of an unobservable and notional immaterial world and went off down a gigantic centuries long blind alley Not that MacCulloch is banging the atheist drum he doesn't take sides and it's difficult to tell from this book what his beliefs might be but there is a definite sense of indulgence towards those motivated by faith whether they are baptising slaves as they are taken off the ships or deciding not to burn so many witches or finding good scriptural reasons for suppressing Galileo's knowledge compared to a rather snide tone towards the personal failings of the Enlightenment philosophers However there is an awful lot in this book to bolster any atheist in his or her beliefs It becomes very amusing as the history moves into the period of growing secularisation human rights and scientific understanding uite how often MacCulloch notes that developments offered an opportunity for humility for churches

Christianity The First Three Thousand YearsSus' message spread and how the New Testament was formed We follow the Christian story to all corners of the globe filling in often neglected accounts of conversions and confrontations in Africa and Asia And we discover the roots of the faith that galvanized America charting the rise of the evangelical movement from its origins in Germany and England This book encompasses all of intellectual history we meet monks and crusaders heretics and saints slave traders and abolitionists and discover Christianity's essential role in driving the enlightenment and the age of exploration and shaping This is a work of remarkable scholarship and erudition staggeringly comprehensive & packed with characters ideas isms and schisms than anyone could possibly remember What it doesn't do is discuss the emotional and spiritual benefits which religious people presumably get from their faith It is very much a bureaucratic history of the organisational and power structures of Christianity over the millennia and that focus brings a number of issues to the fore i The extent to which a religion's spread is dependent on the support of militarily and economically successful temporal power ii The sheer scale of the time and manpower devoted to attempting to impose uniformity of thought on a range of issues which by their very nature are unknowable iii The extent to which core Christian beliefs and practices were developed long after Christ's lifetime in response to changing geographical and historical circumstances iv The remarkable triviality of many of the issues over which Christians have been ready to hate fight and kill one another Is Christ one personality in two forms or two personalities one human and one divine? Does the Holy Spirit proceed from God and Christ or from God alone? Is there a Trinity and if so what is the pecking order within it? Is Mary the mother of the world? Should the host be elevated? v The strangeness of many of the concepts at the heart of the Christian message sin grace salvation and particularly the weird obsession which seems to be one of the constant themes of the history as MacCulloch tells it with the end days and the apocalysperapture which so many people appear to have been imminently anticipating and hoping for since the time of Jesus Watching the history unfold over than 1000 pages the reader wonders whether to admire Christianity as a structure for preserving scholarship and knowledge and civility through centuries of turmoil and strife or to look on horrified at the waste of so much time and effort and resource on arguing over unanswerable uestions The way MacCulloch tells it it almost seems that mankind was offered a choice 2000 years ago between the approaches of Aristotle based on learning from observation of the reality of the material world and Jesus based on assumptions about the nature of an unobservable and notional immaterial world and went off down a gigantic centuries long blind alley Not that MacCulloch is banging the atheist drum he doesn't take sides and it's difficult to tell from this book what his beliefs might be but there is a definite sense of indulgence towards those motivated by faith whether they are baptising slaves as they are taken off the ships or deciding not to burn so many witches or finding good scriptural reasons for suppressing Galileo's knowledge compared to a rather snide tone towards the personal failings of the Enlightenment philosophers However there is an awful lot in this book to bolster any atheist in his or her beliefs It becomes very amusing as the history moves into the period of growing secularisation human rights and scientific understanding uite how often MacCulloch notes that developments offered an opportunity for humility for churches

ebook × The First Three Thousand Years è Diarmaid MacCulloch

Christianity: The First Three Thousand Years × The National Book Critics Circle Award winning author of The Reformation returns with the definitive history of Christianity for our time Once in a generation a historian will redefine his field producing a book that demands to be read a product of electrifying scholarship conveyed with commanding skill Diarmaid MacCulloch's Christianity is such a book Breathtaking in ambition it ranges back to the origins of the Hebrew Bible and covers the world following the three main strands of the Christian faith Christianity will teach modern readers things that have been lost in time about how Je This book is over 1000 pages long excluding notes and index Reading it is like a way of life or a devotion than reading a normal book I've been at it for months already reading a little each day and I'm determined to finish it because if I do I will have learned the entire history of Christianity all 3000 years of it It is a long and crazy history but reading this book will give you a basis for being much informed about Christianity's long and varied history which has affected so much in our world There are aspects of Christianity I simply had never heard anything about before for example the Armenian church the Orthodox church Christianity in Africa etc It is very well written and dense but not difficult writing I also watched the 6 part DVD that accompanies this You can see Diarmaid MacCulloch's passion for the subject which comes through in every page He is a truly passionate scholar ebook × The First Three Thousand Years è Diarmaid MacCulloch

Diarmaid MacCulloch è The First Three Thousand Years kindle

Diarmaid MacCulloch è The First Three Thousand Years kindle The course of World War I and World War II We are living in a time of tremendous religious awareness when both believers and non believers are deeply engaged by uestions of religion and tradition seeking to understand the violence sometimes perpetrated in the name of God The son of an Anglican clergyman MacCulloch writes with deep feeling about faith His last book The Reformation was chosen by dozens of publications as Best Book of the Year and won the National Book Critics Circle Award This awe inspiring follow up is a landmark new history of the faith that continues to shape the worl This is a monumental and undoubtedly very well written and absorbing work I was apprehensive about reading it at first given that it was written by someone who although the son of a Christian priest is not actually a believer; perhaps only one who is can truly understand the faith and so present it fairly Nonetheless it's useful to have an analysis from a person who isn't entirely an insider The important thing for both believers and nonbelievers to understand is that it's fair minded It's a warts and all study which uite rightly does not seek to gloss over the fact that Christians have not always lived up to their professed principles their message of love and peace for all It also however makes clear that the faith has included many people of genuine compassion and humanity as well as been responsible for so much in the way of art literature and music along with the atrocities these days where the latter is concerned it's generally the Christians who are the victims Because it covers such a huge scope of space and time there's inevitably a lot that it misses out; in particular it doesn't uite capture the anguish of many Christians in Western Europe at declining church membership and the sense of being under attack by militant atheists whose attitude can be very nasty or the fact that despite the way in which it's vilified by some it's actually evolved over the past century from a monolithic and arguably oppressive institution to something like an agency for benign social work My main gripe is that although the author criticises those who sneer at political correctness his insistence on referring to people and places in the original vernacular it would seem we are expected to say Inka not Inca and Fernando and Isabel rather than Ferdinand and Isabella when referring to the twin rulers of late fifteenth century Spain goes beyond what is necessary and is genuinely irritating the word I would use is pedantic But this shouldn't be allowed to detract from the book's overall value