review Blood River A Journey to Africa's Broken Heart ☆ E-book or Kindle E-pub


free download Blood River A Journey to Africa's Broken Heart

review Blood River A Journey to Africa's Broken Heart ☆ E-book, or Kindle E-pub Ü [EPUB] ✼ Blood River A Journey to Africa's Broken Heart By Tim Butcher – Eyltransferservices.co.uk A compulsively readable account of a journey to the Congo — a country virtually inaccessible to the outsi?s eastern border He passed River A Journey ePUB #8608 through once thriving cities of this country and saw the marks left behind by years of abuse and misrule Almost harrowing miles later he reached the Atlantic Ocean a thinner and a wiser manButcher’s journey was a remarkable feat But the story of the Congo vividly told in Blood River is remarkable still From the Hardcover edition. Inspired by Stanley in 2004 journalist Tim Butcher decided to retrace his steps and follow the River Congo through the heart of Africa The resulting book is part travelogue part history and completely riveting Along the way he meets some fascinating people and has some uite scary adventures Mr Butcher is clearly a lot braver than I am He also writes about the Congo’s history and how its violent colonial past has impacted on its present state corruption lawlessness poverty a country which seems to have gone backwards as the rest of the world has developed Fantastic story fantastic book

Blood River A Journey to Africa's Broken Heart?s eastern border He passed River A Journey ePUB #8608 through once thriving cities of this country and saw the marks left behind by years of abuse and misrule Almost harrowing miles later he reached the Atlantic Ocean a thinner and a wiser manButcher’s journey was a remarkable feat But the story of the Congo vividly told in Blood River is remarkable still From the Hardcover edition. Inspired by Stanley in 2004 journalist Tim Butcher decided to retrace his steps and follow the River Congo through the heart of Africa The resulting book is part travelogue part history and completely riveting Along the way he meets some fascinating people and has some uite scary adventures Mr Butcher is clearly a lot braver than I am He also writes about the Congo’s history and how its violent colonial past has impacted on its present state corruption lawlessness poverty a country which seems to have gone backwards as the rest of the world has developed Fantastic story fantastic book

read & download ã E-book, or Kindle E-pub Ú Tim Butcher

Blood River A Journey to Africa's Broken Heart Ê A compulsively A Journey PDFEPUB #230 readable account of a journey to the Congo a country virtually inaccessible to the outside world vividly told by a daring and adventurous journalistEver since Stanley first charted its mighty river in the s the Congo has epitomized the dark and turbulent history of a failed continent However its troubles only served to increase Blood River PDF. The author reads the audio version of this book The book is very good and definitely worth reading but choose the paper format Tim Butcher is an English born broadcaster journalist and author of travel books with a slant toward adventure He narrates uickly very uickly The rapid speed diminishes the listening experience It is not pleasant to listen to a book read this fast I am giving the audiobook performance one star This is my way of letting it be known that I do not want audiobooks to be read uickly Further the audiobook version should have been accompanied by a PDF file with maps and photos Now to the interesting topic the book Tim Butcher writes of his journey from Lake Tanganyika at the eastern border of the Democratic Republic of the Congo westward to the mouth of the Congo River on the Atlantic He traveled alone set off in August 2004 carried only a knapsack and camera a pocketknife and 2000 in his right and left boot His journey took 44 days His plan was to follow the route taken by Henry Morton Stanley Yep that Stanley the Stanley that found David Livingston in 1871 Both Butcher and Stanley were employees of the London based paper the Daily Telegraph In addition Butcher’s mother had resided in towns along the river back in the 1950s; she had spoken of her memories with delight He sets out to compare the Congo of times passed of the 1950s and 1870s and the Congo of today The passage of years has not brought the prosperity one assumes the progression of time will bring From the 1950s conditions have gone backwards The Democratic Republic of the Congo is not merely underdeveloped it is using Butcher’s own words underdeveloping The book draws an alarmingly vivid picture of the violence anarchy and lawlessness that existed in 2004 and still todayThe steps of Butcher’s journey are followed in chronological order from start to finish Relevant tangential information is interspersed throughout A large amount of historical geopolitical sociological geographical meteorological and natural historical facts supplement the text Mention is made of authors who have set their stories in the Congo River Basin All of this I like very much The variety stimulates interest There is however repetition; some topics are returned to multiple timesThe history of places passed through is fascinating Kalemi formerly Albertville the Arab slave trade center Kasongo Kisangani formerly Stanleyville and Kinshasa formerly Léopoldville are examples It is important to note that in 1885 eight years after Stanley’s exploratory travels along the Congo River King Leopold II of Belgium claimed the Congo Free State as a private possession Rather than making it a colony he declared it to be his own making its natural resources his too Leopold’s and Belgium’s plundering of the land’s resources the atrocities committed the transfer of possession to the Belgian state independence granted in 1960 the mercenary armies of the following decade Mobutu’s dictatorial reign lasting over thirty years the rebel uprisings and wars of the late 1990s and the succession of Congolese presidents from Lumumba to Mobutu to Laurent Kabila to Joseph Kabila are covered Readers are given the opportunity to observe corrupt dealings both in the past and in the present during Butcher’s journey as well as those individuals who proved themselves to be trustworthy and helpful Without their support Butcher’s journey could never have been successfully completedThe author speaks of the dire need for the implementation of a functioning judicial system The country has great natural resources—copper diamonds gold cobalt timber and tin—but profits have lined the pockets of those wielding power rather than back to the Congolese nation its infrastructure and its people He proposes no concrete solutions on how to bring about change Nor does he sufficiently point out the failure of the Belgian government to provide an adeuate amount of money and time to train the Congolese people in the art of self government ie before independence I always give two ratings to an auddioook—the first for the book’s written content and the second for its narration The book’s content I have given four stars but its narration only one read & download ã E-book, or Kindle E-pub Ú Tim Butcher

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Tim Butcher Ú 9 download Or the interest of Daily Telegraph correspondent Tim Butcher who was sent to cover Africa in Before long he became obsessed with the idea of recreating Stanley’s original expedition but travelling aloneDespite warnings River A Journey to Africa's Kindle Butcher spent years poring over colonial era maps and wooing rebel leaders before making his will and venturing to the Congo?. In 2004 Tim Butcher realised his dream of crossing the Congo from side to side It’s an enormous country with hugely challenging terrain He was following in the footsteps of his hero Henry Stanley – he of “Dr Livingstone I presume” fame They shared a link Both Butcher and Stanley were journalists working for The Telegraph newspaper in London Tim ButcherIn some way his trip was every bit as difficult as that experienced by Stanley Exhaustingly high levels of humidity and heat matted rainforest mosuitoes roads reduced to pot holed muddy paths through the jungle seriously hostile and dangerous fighting factions very few and very primitive hotels difficulties in finding food sometimes even difficulty in finding water He also had to rely on other people providing him with transport and to guide him across this difficult landscape – motorbikes to get him across the land and boats to get him down the Congo river Obtaining these things was not easyHerewith his description of a typical Congolese town – Kalemie view spoilerOf the buildings themselves there was little left beyond the fronts Rust had not just coloured the roofs but eaten out huge holes through which tropical rain had flooded for countless rainy seasons Damp seasonal flooding from the nearby lake and collapsed foundations meant the interior rooms were mostly empty Pipes that once brought mains water to each building lay broken and there was not one working light bulb The town’s main terrace of shops looked like one of those Hollywood filmsets which from the front has the appearance of solidity but from the back is nothing but a few beams propping up a façade hide spoiler